Posts tagged "medieval studies"

Para-Academia & Theory Fiction | Session 1: Nicola Masciandaro on Commentary

Thursday, May 19, 2011 
Observatory at Proteus Gowanus, 543 Union Street, Brooklyn 
Presented by the Hollow Earth Society and The Public School New York

Blogs, Speculative Medievalisms, Collapse, Cyclonopedia, Lovecraft, print-on-demand: the idea of “para-academia” has arisen in recent years as an addendum and an ultimatum to established disciplines and practices.

The Public School New York will explore these emerging ideas and modes of expression through a series of discussions and writing workshops.

Questioning the concept of the ‘marginal’, this session will consider commentary as a para-academic and theory-fictional mode of thinking and writing. Specific topics to be discussed include geometrics of commentarial thought, contemplation vs. speculation, hidden writing and acontextual scholarship, philological eros, and destructive reading. A theoretical introduction will be followed by open discussion of the texts and the futures of commentary.

Nicola Masciandaro is Associate Professor of English at Brooklyn College and a specialist in medieval literature. He is founding editor of Glossator: Practice and Theory of the Commentary and co-director of the open-access press Punctum Books. For more information, see The Whim.

For related texts and more information, go to http://nyc.thepublicschool.org/class/3268

Audio from the second session in the series featuring Wythe Marschall on Gnostic Vertigo in Bataille and Lovecraft can be found here.

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On the subject of commentary, here is a book that is highly recommended.
In the Vineyard of the Text by Ivan Illich
From University of Chicago Press Books:
In a work with profound implications for the electronic age, Ivan Illich explores how revolutions in technology affect the way we read and understand text.
Examining the Didascalicon of Hugh of St. Victor, Illich celebrates the culture of the book from the twelfth century to the present. Hugh’s work, at once an encyclopedia and guide to the art of reading, reveals a twelfth-century revolution as sweeping as that brought about by the invention of the printing press and equal in magnitude only to the changes of the computer age—the transition from reading as a vocal activity done in the monastery to reading as a predominantly silent activity performed by and for individuals.
Learn more about commentary and its possible future here.

On the subject of commentary, here is a book that is highly recommended.

In the Vineyard of the Text by Ivan Illich

From University of Chicago Press Books:

In a work with profound implications for the electronic age, Ivan Illich explores how revolutions in technology affect the way we read and understand text.

Examining the Didascalicon of Hugh of St. Victor, Illich celebrates the culture of the book from the twelfth century to the present. Hugh’s work, at once an encyclopedia and guide to the art of reading, reveals a twelfth-century revolution as sweeping as that brought about by the invention of the printing press and equal in magnitude only to the changes of the computer age—the transition from reading as a vocal activity done in the monastery to reading as a predominantly silent activity performed by and for individuals.

Learn more about commentary and its possible future here.


The Future of Commentary

A roundtable discussion on the future of commentary with David Greetham, Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Avital Ronell, Jesus Rodriguez Velasco. Moderator: Nicola Masciandaro. Glossing is Glorious: The Past, Present, and Future of Commentary, CUNY Graduate Center. April 9, 2009. Sponsored by Glossator: Practice and Theory of the Commentary

Related links:

“Talk to me about the Ontology of Commentary” (Illumined) by kvond via Frames/Sing
Affects and Their Gravities: Commentary as a Capacity of Care by Dan Remein via Wrætlic: The Notebooks of Egil on the Trammes of Tresoun

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